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Monday, 24 August 2009

Spotter Cards










A hand picked selection of FIT cops and photogs for this years climate camp. Click on the above for downloadable and printable images - get all four for the best guide to who's who in the FIT. Why not play a bit of FITwatch bingo? See how many you can tick off - Special FITwatch prize to whoever sends in the most pics of this 'orrible lot. Don't know what it'll be, but I'm sure we'll think of something...

46 comments:

Anonymous said...

Which is the 'Intelligent' one?

jonsparta said...

The ones not in the photos! lol.

Ben Aldin said...

I wonder whether it would be possible to create an openly viewable internet file on each of these gentlemen. Each file would be headed by his photograph, name, police service number and then details of what they have done.

Theirs, spying and using photography to intimidate the innocent, is not an honourable profession.

Anonymous said...

Well indeed Mr.Aldin,

The FIT are themselves very, very keen and enthusiastic about keeping photographic records of all and sundry. I'm sure that we are all sure and certain that they will applaud your splendid, indeed obvious extrapolation of their very subject matter - their life's work I suppose. I would not be a bit surprised if they do not begin to voluntarily provide their details themselves.
...and then here's one of me in my Sunday best... sort of thing

three good cheers!!!

Anonymous said...

'defycops' eh ? When I were a lad, people who 'defied cops' were called criminals.

I hope you die a slow painful death.

Anonymous said...

Luckily I will not need to waste my time using my truncheon on Ben Aldin - he will soon be dead already !!

But look on the bright side, when you protesters are burgled while away on the protests [and since we know who you are, we could easily 'have a word' with those, er, 'known to the police...'] you will at least know who to call to help you find the miscreants and re-unite you with your possessions.

Oh, I forgot, you probably think that, er, 'property is theft', but not when it's your iPod, eh ??

Have fun...

Anonymous said...

Ah - you see, when I suggested taking the police at face value - that perhaps they had changed, maybe we all should get along etc - yes, well it turns out I was spouting bollox, doesn't it?

Clovis said...

anonymous 1218

you may want to remind yourself what happened to jonathan wild, the famous thief-taker, who in his day made a vast fortune out of reuniting people with their stolen property, whose theft he himself had organised.

DAVE BONES said...

Ian skivens said he would join us if they could have longer holidays and bigger truncheons

Anonymous said...

anon @ 12:18 said of Ben Aldin

'he will soon be dead already!!'

now - exclamation marks aside!!....who recognises a syntactical colloquialism??

well...never mind, eh??
sheer coincidence, guv.

Anonymous said...

@Anonymous said...25 August 2009 12:18

'when you protesters are burgled while away on the protests [and since we know who you are, we could easily 'have a word' with those, er, 'known to the police...'] you will at least know who to call to help you find the miscreants and re-unite you with your possessions.'

And just who do you suggest we call if we've been the victims of crime? The police? What a fucking joke.

You lot are too busy protecting big business and over-policing peaceful protest to to do proper police work.

Anonymous said...

Of course, fitwatch will now be distributing the glut of 'fake blood capsules' following the untimely rumbling of the Harlequins 'Bloodgate' scam..

Still, as the coach will have nowt to do for the next 3 years, perhaps you will take him on as a consultant ?

Anonymous said...

Talking of nowt to do for the next few years, and with the activities of FIT being so tightly controlled by the opposition one wonders if they will be looking for ventures new.
How about checking out the football hooligans, you know I’m sure FIT would go down really well with them.
How about sticking to the same MO and lets see how far they get, simple things like we have seen with protest groups over the last few years, or is the prospect of realising that the hooligans may well not be as placid just too frightening to handle?
I doubt very much the true hooligan would be all that welcoming and I would guess a significant number of them would be more than happy to oblige in a bit of blood letting.
Now FIT, lets see where your spine is on this one shall we or will you just disappear under your rocks.
The knuckle draggers are of course also going to be in a bit of a fix with little or no guidance, direction from the TA’s , a frightening prospect for them as they might end up doing some real police work.

Anonymous said...

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?ref=home#/group.php?gid=24943717497&ref=ts


http://stop-police-brutality.blogspot.com/

:-)

Anonymous said...

I find it hilarious that some of the posters here appear to believe that the rozzers would waste their time leaving comments on a blog like this.

No doubt you will soon be unmasked by Google anyway...

Clovis said...

anon 1331

given that metcountymounty, who regularly posts here, is a cop who until recently maintained a blog, perhaps you should reconsider your comments. there are a number of other plod who post here - claims that they don't simply don't coincide with reality.

nympho said...

Cops at the campsite on Blackheath today included Superintendent Julia Pendry (runner up - silver commander), MD 61, 1818, CO 4015, CO 101

Anonymous said...

Oh, I am so looking forward to this !! I bit of light truncheon activity which if followed by 'resisting arrest' can lead to a main course of tasering followed by a dessert of shoving of an electro-shock baton up the old front bottom...

Have a nice day !!

ACAB said...

Anonymous at 12:18 26th

"Of course, fitwatch will now be distributing the glut of 'fake blood capsules' following the untimely rumbling of the Harlequins 'Bloodgate' scam.."

Erm, long before the Harlequins dreamed this up it was used .... by the cops at Kingsnorth.

They claimed that their £7.5m operation was justified by 70 injuries to officers. It later transpired that these were inflicted by wasps, fools shutting car doors onto their own legs and the like. Not one inflicted by a climate camper.

It was also at Kingsnorth that FIT shot that wonderful footage that ended up on the front page of the Guardian.

Oh how we all larfed

Metcountymounty said...

Anon 0500 - a bit of a history lesson for you, FIT started with football hooligans and worked so effectively they developed it further to demonstrators primarily after J18 and mayday. Along with most of the public order tactics, it started with football and we still do considerably more at matches than the majority of demos, it just rarely hits the news unless it really goes pearshaped like it did the other night.

Anonymous said...

metcountymounty.
Well the historics of fit are wasted on me old chap, my point was clear and simple.
Go and play with the real hooligans in the same manner as you have the protestors.
And speaking of the other night, what went wrong there then was there no intelligence that there was going to be trouble, or did the intelligence gatherers fail to see the various forums offering up the chance of a bit of a pre match kick around.
Or were the intelligence gatherers too pre occupied and licking their lips with the possibility of smacking around a few protestors who weren’t going to pose them any real challenge or retaliation.
In short another foot shooting exercise by the met.

Anonymous said...

"given that metcountymounty, who regularly posts here, is a cop who until recently maintained a blog.."

He actually works for the SIS.

Anonymous said...

I've just received a large quantity of soap, where would ye protesters like them?!

Anonymous said...

The police had requested that no away fans were allowed to the game, but were turned down by the FA, as such they had to deal with it as they did, rather than avoiding it all together as they had hoped.

Anonymous said...

I've just received a large quantity of soap, where would ye protesters like them?!

Try dropping it off in Westminster or in particular NSY.
They could try it out on cleaning up the credit card scampsters and the hsot of other dirt that tarnishes the names of all decent officers.

Metcountymounty said...

anon 1423 - as I said, we do go out and deal with football hooligans, all the time. There were plenty of commentators and posters saying after the G20 on various news sites that the Police have been dealing with them (football fans/hooligans) like that for years, even some of the blog authors here acknowledge that fact? Why do you think there is no where near as much violence at matches as there used to be? It's because we do Police matches hard when we need to. I've been at some cracking C and C+ matches over the last few years that have kicked off ina big way but you never really hear about it, rather like carnival actually but that's another matter.

As for the other night, I guarantee that a vast majority of those people who kicked off or at the very least were threatening and abusive to the opposing 'fans' would have had previous convictions so how about we just ban anyone who has a conviction for any drunkenness, violence, criminal damage or public order offences from leaving the house on match day or indeed any other day where a group of people may get together and have a tear up?

It would certainly make things easier for us but I know a lot of 'fans' would probably disagree, along with Liberty and a few others.

The match was rated a cat C+ which had the highest level of resourcing available to it given all the other matches being played out in London on that day, we haven't got infinite numbers of people to resource into something, especially if it hasn't kicked off yet. No matter how hard you try and stop things thing breaking out in the stadium if there are enough of them then you can't control it without a increased use of force which either has to be used against an entire group to be effective or against an individual to the point of deterring others. As has been all over the news and sites like this since the G20 it's obviously far from ideal (and bloody terrifying for some people) if some within the group or the vicinity are nothing to do with the violence.

anon 1555 - I'm not a spook!

Anonymous said...

Metcountymounty.
Whilst what you say does on the face of it sound about right i maybe mistaken but i do think you have skirted around my point.
Fit, TA officers and the likes seem only too willing to get in amongst the protestors sometimes at extremely close quarters, yet seem not to be so keen on mixing it with the hooligans.
That sounds to me to be like two very different policies on policing what the police try and tell us are both violent parties.
Now if its good enough to go and get stuck into protestors (innocence as we are told by the met is difficult to see at times) then surely there should be the same level of policing hooligans.
How many fit officers and or TA’s take it upon themselves at a football event to go around targeting individuals as we see at protests, how many will go and ruffle a few feathers to get a reaction at a football event like they seem only too willing to do at a protest.
Sorry mate but its two different worlds that some would try and have us believe are one.
On the specific subject of the match the other night, I wonder in comparative terms how many of fit were deployed to the match and say climate camp.
As a rough guess I would say the numbers might be comparable, the risk of climate camp in the city (already contained) kicking off must have been about equal if the police version of event is to be believed, to the risk of the hooligans kicking off.
Now although months apart if we are to believe the police the risk was more or less the same, the numbers about the same yet handled very differently.
Football hooligans get to kick off, protestors get smacked about for not kicking off.

Metcountymounty said...

anon, "Fit, TA officers and the likes seem only too willing to get in amongst the protestors sometimes at extremely close quarters, yet seem not to be so keen on mixing it with the hooligans"

I think you need to go to some more high category football matches and get a bit more clued up on what we actually do instead of believing your own conjecture. YES the FIO's, FIT and the TA's do get in with the risk groups, as do the rest of us. Like I said, its the main reason that there is no where near as much trouble at football matches as there used to be.

The main differences between demos and football is that the vast majority of football supporters actually think we should be there because a few known risk 'supporters' want to do nothing but fight and cause trouble that effects everyone.

Ben Aldin said...

Is there not a crucial difference between the police control of football matches and political activists? In the former case the police need only subdue those who step over the line, so they prevent no danger to person or property. In time these hooligans will sink into being passive members of the working class.

In the case of political activists, they need thorough investigation and recording as individuals because they question the rule of the capitalist state itself. Theirs is likely to be a life-long activity.

Anonymous said...

It's interesting to see how the police behave towards football fans who complain about their behaviour.

Have a look at what's happening in Sunderland at the moment. It's very reminiscent of what happens to activists.

Although to be fair the police did make sure that they weren't dealing with really dangerous hooligans before they started abusing people.

jonsparta said...

Although to be fair the police did make sure that they weren't dealing with really dangerous hooligans before they started abusing people.

29 August 2009 02:39

Never met a non-dangerous hoologan...must be at the wrong matches...

Anonymous said...

@jonsparta

You obviously can't tell the difference between less dangerous and non-dangerous then.

Then again it's common for public order police to claim that everyone and anyone is highly dangerous, while them beating people in the head until they have fits and bleed everywhere is a safe and humane way of controlling a crowd.

jonsparta said...

30 August 2009 10:21

Then again it's common for public order police to claim that everyone and anyone is highly dangerous, while them beating people in the head until they have fits and bleed everywhere is a safe and humane way of controlling a crowd.

Common? No.
I never claim anyone is dangerous, until they start spitting in my face, throwing bricks or bottles. Or coming up to the line and start shouting lovely words such as: "i going to fucking kill you.." "I going to rape your wife/girlfriend/partner.." (thats a personal fav of mine, you can swap it around and all sorts, you know to help fit the situation.)

I know i am being sarcastic but this is what happens. I think you would be the first to complain if the police were not there and the demo turned into a riot. Haing seen it from both ends its not pretty. A few people can cause the vast majority a lot of pain. I saw it and felt it in the 90's anti-nazi league. I felt that some of the orgainisation made it worst for themselves by trying to attack BNP/NF meetings etc. This amongst other reason is why i left, good days tho.

As for the death you are so badly pointing too, well if the cop is in the wrong the hang him high but that is not for you or me to decide. But i doubt that will stop the armchair general in you from casting your opinions about. As Fran├žois-Marie Arouet (Voltaire to you) once said, "I detest what you write, but I would give my life to make it possible for you to continue to write.”

Remember they are those that believe in duty and honour even in the face of violent hatred dressed up as protecting democratic values...

Anonymous said...

@jonsparta
You obviously know nothing about the case I'm talking about if you're talking about one cop and somebody dying.

And, for the record, I don't have a problem with the police. I have a problem with two things, individual corruption and bad management.

They occur in all sorts of organisations, it's just that the huge amounts of power that a police officer is given make them incredibly dangerous in the police.

You've talked a lot on here about the brave police officers stopping riots and protecting people, but I've seen a very different side of the police over the last few years.

An officer knocking over an old disabled man in his haste to chase a fare-dodger on the metro. Shouting "get out of the fucking way" as the man falls, and his colleagues showing no disapproval, making no attempt to help the man up.

Two PCSOs and two PCs making personal comments about the appearance of people who walked past where they were stood talking.

Two officers stopping a black guy from getting on a train because they felt that he might be a danger to a younger white woman who'd started a conversation with him. As they said to him, she was drunk and they couldn't be too careful, but the guy hadn't done anything untoward. He'd just refused to lend her his mobile phone and then had a conversation with her about music. Nobody white was stopped from getting on the train.

Drunks who weren't violent, just incoherent being really shoved around while they're cuffed. Given a bit of a roughing up just for being drunk.

Then there's what happened to the Sunderland supporters at Central Station. Every police press release contradicting the one before. The CCTV evidence that proves they were violent, but all we can be shown is footage of a couple of guys jumping up and down.

This doesn't even look like the same police force I used to respect when I was younger.

jonsparta said...

individual corruption and bad management.

No problem there, just look at the banks or the NHS.

it's just that the huge amounts of power that a police officer is given make them incredibly dangerous in the police.

Hmm. Strange one, their is more laws/powers but a lot of police powers have been given away to councils, ASBO units and the like. Still i take your point but again a lot of officers are pulling back from using powers because they are afraid of PSD units.

but I've seen a very different side of the police over the last few years.

There is good and bad. Point should be made that i remember that a uni prof stated about the military but i think we can use it for the police, the police are and a reflection of the society around them, they are not separate but of the whole...

But, and there always is, the older officers always say that its getting worse. More powers has not meant less crime but more. I can only give you a snap shot but yes some streets are very unsafe and a few are very dangerous. No fear of the police, courts or society in general. I always get the same thing from victims of crimes, why cant you get a hold of these burglars, rapists, child molesters, murders etc and kick the crap out of them? Easy answer, society protects criminals.

As for your two stories, yes i could believe them. I could give you a load of examples of good police work but that never wins headlines. One bad incidents stains for a life time but a hundred good ones wash out in a day. Another way of looking at things is most of the time the public are not aware of the whole picture. I have walked into a large well known shopping centre because a member of the public has stated that some males have been seen with a knife. I radio up and state that i have a description and can i have a taser unit. Answer no, divisional response no back up. Off i go, CCTV has found the pair next a exit. I approach, they know i coming for them. One male makes off, i pull the other to the floor and a fight ensure. I dont use CS because of the people around and batons are next are crap. So how does it look to you? I could be getting a beating, do you intervene or let me get a kicking? Do you get all moral as i get him in a head lock and them struggle to get the cuffs on?

BTW, he had didnt have a knife but two. Lucky for me i got a cheap shot at his glass jaw...

Anonymous said...

@jonsparta
With regard to police powers, I don't just mean new laws that have been brought in, or specific legal powers. I'm talking more about the basic power that a police officer has.

You're armed (and I don't totally buy how "crap" batons are given that the public can't carry them). You've got the ability to arrest somebody and mess up their day (and possibly their career). You've got a radio that can summon large number of other officers, including firearms units, and you'll generally be believed by a court far more than a member of the public.

The mistake (or maliciousness) of a police officer can result in an innocent person spending a year on bail before a court appearance where they're totally cleared, because all of the evidence points to their innocence. I've seen it happen.

Equally the mistake (or maliciousness) of a police officer can turn a slightly unruly large group into a riot, or result in a stupid drunk dying.

I get what you're saying about not blaming the good officers, and about the public desire for retribution against criminals. The problem is that there are problems with the police force as a whole.

Good officers regularly do turn a blind eye to the actions of bad ones. Bad management, even at an incident level does result in horrific consequences. When two groups of officers managing a public order situation aren't co-ordinated properly you can end up with members of the public badly hurt or killed without much (or in some cases any) individual wrong doing from officers.

One group pushes the crowd forwards, the other group pushes them back, both groups seeing the crowd fighting against being pushed as aggression, rather than having nowhere to go.

Blaming it on society doesn't really help either. I agree that a lot of what's wrong with the police is a reflection of society. Then again the behaviour of the police force will have a big effect on society. Somebody has to take responsibility somewhere. I suspect that the guys with weapons and powers of arrest should probably be some of the first to do that.

ray said...

At the Carni yesterday I noticed cops wearing inch wide blue bands slipped over their shoulder boards. Was that FIT trying to be inconspicuous?

Clovis said...

sure they weren't pcsos?

Metcountymounty said...

Ray, they were pcso's, thanks for proving the arguments of the police federation since the pcso's started that their uniform is supposed to fool people into thinking there are more police on the street when there aren't.

ray said...

Clovis and Metcountymounty probably right. Red herring etc but I'm not talking about the normal blue pcso epaulette but an inch wide blue band slipped over the usual shoulder board.

Anonymous said...

could have been from training school..

ACAB said...

Metcountymounty: 28 August 2009 07:47
" we haven't got infinite numbers of people to resource into something, especially if it hasn't kicked off yet"

You obviously have forgotten Kingsnorth where uniformed thugs were drafted in from all over the country days before anything was scheduled to kick off.

Anonymous said...

So it kicking off was planned then ACAB? Good job the police were there!

AM said...

"kicking off was planned" Anonymous. To the police a peaceful protest is kicking off.

Anonymous said...

I find it incredible that there are sites like these that are anti-Police. I'd expect it of some scote of a 'hoodie' or one of our 'bearded brother of beelzebub' friends, but not of sane, law abiding people. The Police have a tough time to protect us and need all the assistance they can get from 'normal' people. I really cannot see the logic in people being afraid of having information about them on a file. Big deal, if by holding everybody's data, they manage to prevent/detect a crime or attrocity then surely it is worth it. The Police, as with the rest of us, are not perfect but we should stand in support of them.

Aldin said...

That really fit secure and taking great pride in addressing our client's individual security requirements and proposing solutions that best fit their needs.